Freshmen: No cannolis for you

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Freshmen: No cannolis for you

North End Boston

North End Boston

By Alexius Horatius (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

North End Boston

By Alexius Horatius (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

By Alexius Horatius (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

North End Boston

CAROLINE ENOS, Contributor

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The Italian classes are buzzing with anticipation for the upcoming North End trip on May 26, where students will spend the day experiencing the Italian culture of Boston.

However, for the first time in 20 years, the freshmen will not attend. The field trip is only being offered to seniors and juniors this year. While sophomores do not usually attend the trip due to MCAS make up work, this is the first time that freshman are not allowed to go.

“I think it’s a great field trip,” said Principal Erik Anderson. “But it’s more appropriate for upperclassmen.”

“In the past we have had local native Italians speak to the group about the history and influence of immigrants in North Boston” said Italian teacher and program leader Celestino Basile. “This year again, I asked the new speaker to give a short tour and speak about the North End.”

“The freshmen were traditionally invited as well. However, there was a change this year. Mr. Anderson decided to keep the freshmen in the building for the sake of time on learning,” said Basile.  “Mr. Anderson also sees the field trip as an award for students who stay in the language program, instead of students who stay for the college requirement of two years and then drop the class.”

While the trip is a great opportunity for upperclassmen, many freshmen are still disappointed that they cannot go.

“Actually being able to go on this trip could influence the freshmen to keep the class for longer than the two year college requirement,” stated freshman Ericca Nolan. “Engaging students in activities like these has a strong influence on their perspectives of the class.”

“I don’t blame the students for being upset,” said Italian teacher Rayanne Menery. “I know they were excited.”

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